Recent Storm Damage Posts

Updated 2019 Hurricane Predictions

7/11/2019 (Permalink)

Researchers are expecting a normal to average hurricane season this year. Recent projections from this week predict between 9 and 15 named storms could occur in 2019. 4 to 8 of these have the potential to become hurricanes, and 2 to 4 as major hurricanes- between Category 3 and 5.

Subtropical Storm Andrea was the first named storm of the year and formed on May 20th, 2019 before the official start of Hurricane Season (June 1st). Andrea fizzled out the next day and was reduced to a subtropical depression. This is the 5th year in a row that a named storm has been declared prior to hurricane season.

You can keep track of this year’s latest hurricane activity on the National Hurricane Center’s website: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/.

If you are affected by water or storm damage this hurricane season, call SERVPRO of Portsmouth at 757-397-3770. We will work hard to get you and your family back in your home or business and make it feel “Like it never even happened.”

2019 Hurricane Preparedness Tips

7/3/2019 (Permalink)

Are you prepared for hurricane season? Hurricane season is upon us and here at SERVPRO of Norfolk/Portsmouth we urge our community to be prepared for any emergencies that might arise. Hurricane Season officially runs June 1st through November 30th.

No one can predict when a disaster will strike but as we are entering hurricane season, it is always a great idea to be prepared just in case.

Hurricanes are classified into 5 categories, with a category 5 hurricane having the potential to do the most damage. Category 5 hurricanes have been known to produce winds over 150 miles per hour, so make sure to take the necessary precautions to protect your family, home, and workplace. Secure your outdoor tools and furniture and board up all windows with plywood. Turn off utilities and propane tanks if instructed to do so by the authorities. You can get a complete recommended list of hurricane preparedness tips on FEMA’s website at www.fema.gov.

 Make sure you and your family have a disaster kit that will last you for three days (72 hours) that is equipped with the proper supplies, including batteries, a flashlight, first aid supplies, cash, and copies of your identification/documentation. Be prepared for the possibility that you lose water and power and be aware that you may not be able to evacuate due to flooded or blocked roads. Always have a list of your emergency contacts readily available.

 It is extremely important to have an evacuation plan and know your local evacuation route for both your home and your workplace.

The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know where you will ride out the storm and get your supplies now. You don’t want to be standing in long lines when a Hurricane Watch is issued. Those supplies that you need will probably be sold out by the time you reach the front of the line. Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water.

 If you aren’t sure where to begin, there are plenty of resources out there to help you. A great place to start is Ready.gov and RedCross.org.  These sites will help you create a supply list, communication plans and even design an evacuation plan should it be necessary.  If you own a business, you can contact SERVPRO of Norfolk/Portsmouth to create an Emergency Ready Profile. This is a free service that compiles vital emergency information, photographs of crucial shutoffs, and contacts into an easily accessible app form.  Residential customers, you can create your own ERP by visiting clicking here.  Having a plan in place can help you minimize damage and recovery times!

The Polar Vortex and What to Expect in Winter Seasons 2019

2/15/2019 (Permalink)

Polar vortexes, or polar cyclones as they are sometimes called, are climatological features that hover near the poles year-round. These cold-core low-pressure areas strengthen in the winter and weaken in the summer.  Strengthening storm systems within the troposphere (the lowest portion of the Earth’s atmosphere) can act to intensify the polar vortex by significantly cooling the poles. A portion of the polar vortex can be fragmented and plunge over Canada, the Midwestern, Central, Southern and Northeastern United States.  This alteration in the polar vortex can occur due to the displacement of the polar jet stream. 

An example of this alteration would be the significant northwestern push of the polar jet stream over the Western part of the United States this past winter. This is different than the El Nino and La Nina weather occurrences, which are based on the water temperatures and air pressure in the Pacific Ocean that we have seen in the past. So, will the polar vortex have an effect on the upcoming winter? 

According to the Farmer’s Almanac, this winter the East Coast will be colder with normal to above-normal snowfall.  The coldest periods will be late December through early January and the snowiest periods will be mid-January to early February. Accuweather predicts a soggy, stormy end of the year for the Southeast as a result of the effects of El Nino and even suggests that there may be snow in December. We will have to see if it rains or only sprinkles this winter. 

So it sounds like the Hampton Roads area always needs to prepare for a cold and wet winter. Get your sweaters out, stock up on hot cocoa and prepare your home.  Have the chimney inspected, check to see that your pipes are insulated, remember to turn your faucets to a slow, constant drip if the temperatures will be below 20, disconnect the garden hoses, check all of the weather stripping around your windows and doors, and replace your HVAC filters. All of these things will help keep you and your home safe and minimize any possible damages that could be caused by the sudden drops in temperature.

Although we haven’t seen a whole lot of cold weather so far this winter, it looks like it could still be just around the corner. If it does hit, we probably will not see the same effects as we did on January 21, 1985, when the temperatures dropped to 3 degrees below zero in Norfolk making it the coldest day in the history of Hampton Roads. 

Call SERVPRO of Portsmouth at 757-397-3770.

Preparing for Winter Storms

12/7/2018 (Permalink)

Temperatures dropped and snow fell in Hampton Roads in 2018, and with that there was a common issue that a lot of people were dealing with, frozen and burst pipes. Hampton Roads has been hit by sudden and drastic temperature drops the past two years. This has lead to all sorts of damage, the most common of which is frozen and burst pipes. Hampton Roads is more vulnerable to these types of damages than many norther cities. This is because most of the buildings in Hampton Roads were not designed with these types of temperatures in mind.


If you remember to do the following things, you will maximize your chances of getting through the cold snap without having any major issues or damage.

  • Make Sure Systems Work
  • Insulate Pipes
  • Insulate Everything Else
  • Run Faucets
  • Keep Garage Door Closed
  • Remove, Drain, and Store Hoses
  • Open Cabinets
  • Keep House Temperature Consistent
  • Set Temperature When Out of Town

Remember, it is not spring yet and there is still the possibility of freezing temperatures, snow or other winter weather.

If you do have any issues or questions, please feel free to call us here at SERVPRO of Norfolk/Portsmouth. You can reach us by calling 757-397-3770 and one of our many trained professionals would be happy to assist you.

Be prepared for any storm 2018

9/14/2018 (Permalink)

September is National Preparedness Month and serves as a reminder that we must prepare now, as well as throughout the year, for any emergencies that could arise where we live, work, and visit. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to have a plan of action to keep everyone as safe as possible. Consider the following questions when making your emergency plan:
• How will my family/household get emergency alerts and warnings?
• How will my family/household get to safe locations during an emergency?

• How will my family/household get in touch if cell phone, internet, or landline doesn’t work?

• How will I let loved ones know I am safe?

• How will my family/household get to a meeting place after the emergency?
Your emergency planning should also address the care of pets, aiding family members with access and functional needs and safely shutting off utilities. It is important to check your insurance policy coverage. You can sign up for preparedness tips & weather alerts by downloading the FEMA app & texting PREPARE to 43362 (4FEMA).
You should also inquire about emergency plans at work, daycare and school. If no plans exist, consider volunteering to help create one.
Once you’ve collected this important information, gather your family members and discuss how to put your plan into place. Practice your plan at least twice a year and update it accordingly if any issues should arise.

Call SERVPRO of Portsmouth at 757-397-3770

National Preparedness Month is September 2018

9/14/2018 (Permalink)

September is National Preparedness Month and we encourage you to take action to prep for any emergencies that could arise in your home or workplace. Make an emergency communication plan for both your home and workplace in the event of floods, wildfires, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, and winter storms. Educate yourself and your community with the dangers of these disasters and how to best cope with them.

This month is known for a lot of Hurricane activity and we want to make sure you are prepared in the event a storm does hit our area. 

Make sure you are prepared with a disaster supply kit. During an emergency, it is important that you have cell phone backup power, batteries, flashlights, bottled water, non-perishable food, a first aid kit, battery-powered radio, and portable generator Conduct practice drills with your family and co-workers for each scenario. Be sure that your home and belongings are properly insured. Talk to your neighbors and share your tips on preparedness. You never know when disaster will strike so it is important to take the proper precautions to ensure peace of mind. For more safety tips, along with a complete list of important emergency items visit ReadyVirginia.gov.

Call SERVPRO of Portsmouth 757-397-3770

The Polar Vortex and What to Expect in Winter Seasons 2018

6/20/2018 (Permalink)

Polar vortexes, or polar cyclones as they are sometimes called, are climatological features that hover near the poles year-round. These cold-core low-pressure areas strengthen in the winter and weaken in the summer.  Strengthening storm systems within the troposphere (the lowest portion of the Earth’s atmosphere) can act to intensify the polar vortex by significantly cooling the poles. A portion of the polar vortex can be fragmented and plunge over Canada, the Midwestern, Central, Southern and Northeastern United States.  This alteration in the polar vortex can occur due to the displacement of the polar jet stream. 

An example of this alteration would be the significant northwestern push of the polar jet stream over the Western part of the United States this past winter. This is different than the El Nino and La Nina weather occurrences, which are based on the water temperatures and air pressure in the Pacific Ocean that we have seen in the past. So, will the polar vortex have an effect on the upcoming winter? 

According to the Farmer’s Almanac, this winter the East Coast will be colder with normal to above-normal snowfall.  The coldest periods will be late December through early January and the snowiest periods will be mid-January to early February. Accuweather predicts a soggy, stormy end of the year for the Southeast as a result of the effects of El Nino and even suggests that there may be snow in December. We will have to see if it rains or only sprinkles this winter. 

So it sounds like the Hampton Roads area always needs to prepare for a cold and wet winter. Get your sweaters out, stock up on hot cocoa and prepare your home.  Have the chimney inspected, check to see that your pipes are insulated, remember to turn your faucets to a slow, constant drip if the temperatures will be below 20?, disconnect the garden hoses, check all of the weather stripping around your windows and doors, and replace your HVAC filters. All of these things will help keep you and your home safe and minimize any possible damages that could be caused by the sudden drops in temperature.

Although we haven’t seen a whole lot of cold weather so far this winter, it looks like it could still be just around the corner. If it does hit, we probably will not see the same effects as we did on January 21, 1985 when the temperatures dropped to 3 degrees below zero in Norfolk making it the coldest day in the history of Hampton Roads. 

Call SERVPRO of Portsmouth at 757-397-3770.

Hurricanes in Hampton Roads 2018

6/20/2018 (Permalink)

Just about everyone living in the Hampton Roads area has had to deal with the effects of a hurricane at one point or another. In just the past 15 years, Hampton Roads has been hit by Hurricane Floyd in 1999, Hurricane Isabel in 2003, and Hurricane Irene in 2011. Anyone who was in the area for these storms knows the destruction that comes in the wake of these storms.  Even though there is nothing we can do to prevent storms of this magnitude, there are a lot of things that we can do to better prepare ourselves to deal with them. The first step is to be knowledgeable.

We have been very lucky in years past to have not had any major storms. By all accounts, we were in for a very busy hurricane season. While we are just now entering the peak of the season, we have not seen anything major hit land. Although we have been free and clear, it doesn’t mean we are out of the woods yet. Just last year Hurricane Sandy hit in October. Looking back at 2001, Hurricane Chantal kicked off the hurricane season in September and was followed up by 15 named storms, including nine hurricanes.

So what does this mean for Hampton Roads? It means we are not quite out of the woods yet but we are in the home stretch. Don’t let this period of inactivity lull you to sleep. It is more important than ever to have a plan and to be prepared. You can go to www.ready.gov for more information on making an emergency plan.

If you need help today in preparing emergencies please SERVPRO of Portsmouth at 757-397-3770.

Hurricane Preparedness 2017

9/14/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Hurricane Preparedness 2017 Hurricane Season

Hurricane season is upon us and here at SERVPRO of Portsmouth we urge our community to be prepared for any emergencies that might arise. With recent events in Houston TX and surrounding areas we urge you to always be prepared.  It is extremely important to have an evacuation plan and know your local evacuation route for both your home and your workplace. Make sure you and your family have a disaster kit equipped with the proper supplies, including batteries, a flashlight, first aid supplies, cash, and copies of your identification/documentation. Be prepared for the event that you lose water and power and be aware that you may not be able to evacuate due to flooded or blocked roads. Always have a list of your emergency contacts readily available.

Hurricanes are classified into 5 categories, with a category 5 hurricane having the potential to do the most damage. Category 5 hurricanes have been known to produce winds over 150 miles per hour, so make sure to take the necessary precautions to protect your family, home, and workplace. Secure your outdoor tools and furniture and board up all windows with plywood. Turn off utilities and propane tanks if instructed to do so by the authorities. You can get a complete recommended list of hurricane preparedness tips on FEMA’s website at www.fema.gov.

Hurricane 2017 Prep

9/11/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Hurricane 2017 Prep Be Prepared

Just about everyone living in the Hampton Roads area has had to deal with the effects of a hurricane at one point or another. In just the past 15 years, Hampton Roads has been hit by Hurricane Floyd in 1999, Hurricane Isabel in 2003, and Hurricane Irene in 2011. Anyone who was in the area for these storms knows the destruction that comes in the wake of these storms.  Even though there is nothing we can do to prevent storms of this magnitude, there are a lot of things that we can do to better prepare ourselves to deal with them. The first step is to be knowledgeable.

We have been very lucky in years past to have not had any major storms. By all accounts, we were in for a very busy hurricane season. While we are just now entering the peak of the season, we have not seen anything major hit land. Although we have been free and clear, it doesn’t mean we are out of the woods yet. Just last year Hurricane Sandy hit in October. Looking back at 2001, Hurricane Chantal kicked off the hurricane season in September and was followed up by 15 named storms, including nine hurricanes.

So what does this mean for Hampton Roads? It means we are not quite out of the woods yet but we are in the home stretch. Don’t let this period of inactivity lull you to sleep. It is more important than ever to have a plan and to be prepared. You can go to www.ready.gov for more information on making an emergency plan.

Call SERVPRO of Portsmouth today at 757-397-3770 and we can help you prepare for the storm. 

The Polar Vortex and What to Expect in Winter Seasons

6/20/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage The Polar Vortex and What to Expect in Winter Seasons Be Prepared for Winter

Polar vortexes, or polar cyclones as they are sometimes called, are climatological features that hover near the poles year-round. These cold-core low-pressure areas strengthen in the winter and weaken in the summer.  Strengthening storm systems within the troposphere (the lowest portion of the Earth’s atmosphere) can act to intensify the polar vortex by significantly cooling the poles. A portion of the polar vortex can be fragmented and plunge over Canada, the Midwestern, Central, Southern and Northeastern United States.  This alteration in the polar vortex can occur due to the displacement of the polar jet stream. 

An example of this alteration would be the significant northwestern push of the polar jet stream over the Western part of the United States this past winter. This is different than the El Nino and La Nina weather occurrences, which are based on the water temperatures and air pressure in the Pacific Ocean that we have seen in the past. So, will the polar vortex have an effect on the upcoming winter? 

According to the Farmer’s Almanac, this winter the East Coast will be colder with normal to above-normal snowfall.  The coldest periods will be late December through early January and the snowiest periods will be mid-January to early February. Accuweather predicts a soggy, stormy end of the year for the Southeast as a result of the effects of El Nino and even suggests that there may be snow in December. We will have to see if it rains or only sprinkles this winter. 

So it sounds like the Hampton Roads area will need to prepare for a cold and wet winter. Get your sweaters out, stock up on hot cocoa and prepare your home.  Have the chimney inspected, check to see that your pipes are insulated, remember to turn your faucets to a slow, constant drip if the temperatures will be below 20?, disconnect the garden hoses, check all of the weather stripping around your windows and doors, and replace your HVAC filters. All of these things will help keep you and your home safe and minimize any possible damages that could be caused by the sudden drops in temperature.

Although we haven’t seen a whole lot of cold weather so far this winter, it looks like it could still be just around the corner. If it does hit, we probably will not see the same effects as we did on January 21, 1985 when the temperatures dropped to 3 degrees below zero in Norfolk making it the coldest day in the history of Hampton Roads. 

Call SERVPRO of Portsmouth at 757-397-3770.

Hurricanes in Hampton Roads

6/19/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Hurricanes in Hampton Roads Are you prepared!!!

Just about everyone living in the Hampton Roads area has had to deal with the effects of a hurricane at one point or another. In just the past 15 years, Hampton Roads has been hit by Hurricane Floyd in 1999, Hurricane Isabel in 2003, and Hurricane Irene in 2011. Anyone who was in the area for these storms knows the destruction that comes in the wake of these storms.  Even though there is nothing we can do to prevent storms of this magnitude, there are a lot of things that we can do to better prepare ourselves to deal with them. The first step is to be knowledgeable.

We have been very lucky in years past to have not had any major storms. By all accounts, we were in for a very busy hurricane season. While we are just now entering the peak of the season, we have not seen anything major hit land. Although we have been free and clear, it doesn’t mean we are out of the woods yet. Just last year Hurricane Sandy hit in October. Looking back at 2001, Hurricane Chantal kicked off the hurricane season in September and was followed up by 15 named storms, including nine hurricanes.

So what does this mean for Hampton Roads? It means we are not quite out of the woods yet but we are in the home stretch. Don’t let this period of inactivity lull you to sleep. It is more important than ever to have a plan and to be prepared. You can go to www.ready.gov for more information on making an emergency plan.

Winter Storm 2017

3/7/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Winter Storm 2017 It's not spring yet. Be prepared for colder temps!

Temperatures dropped and snow fell in Hampton Roads in January 2017, and with that there was a common issue that a lot of people were dealing with, frozen and burst pipes. Hampton Roads has been hit by sudden and drastic temperature drops the past two years. This has lead to all sorts of damage, the most common of which is frozen and burst pipes. Hampton Roads is more vulnerable to these types of damages than many norther cities. This is because most of the buildings in Hampton Roads were not designed with these types of temperatures in mind.


If you remember to do the following things, you will maximize your chances of getting through the cold snap without having any major issues or damage.

 

  • Make Sure Systems Work
  • Insulate Pipes
  • Insulate Everything Else
  • Run Faucets
  • Keep Garage Door Closed
  • Remove, Drain, and Store Hoses
  • Open Cabinets
  • Keep House Temperature Consistent
  • Set Temperature When Out of Town

Remember, it is not spring yet and there is still the possibility of freezing temperatures, snow or other winter weather.

 

If you do have any issues or questions, please feel free to call us here at SERVPRO of Norfolk/Portsmouth. You can reach us by calling 757-397-3770 and one of our many trained professionals would be happy to assist you.

Hurricane Preparedness 2017

9/8/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Hurricane Preparedness 2017 Are you prepared for Hurricane Season?

Hurricane season is upon us and here at SERVPRO of Portsmouth we urge our community to be prepared for any emergencies that might arise. With recent events in Houston TX and surrounding areas we urge you to always be prepared.  It is extremely important to have an evacuation plan and know your local evacuation route for both your home and your workplace. Make sure you and your family have a disaster kit equipped with the proper supplies, including batteries, a flashlight, first aid supplies, cash, and copies of your identification/documentation. Be prepared for the event that you lose water and power and be aware that you may not be able to evacuate due to flooded or blocked roads. Always have a list of your emergency contacts readily available.

Hurricanes are classified into 5 categories, with a category 5 hurricane having the potential to do the most damage. Category 5 hurricanes have been known to produce winds over 150 miles per hour, so make sure to take the necessary precautions to protect your family, home, and workplace. Secure your outdoor tools and furniture and board up all windows with plywood. Turn off utilities and propane tanks if instructed to do so by the authorities. You can get a complete recommended list of hurricane preparedness tips on FEMA’s website at www.fema.gov.

National Preparedness Month is September

9/2/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage National Preparedness Month is September Be prepared!!!

September is National Preparedness Month and we encourage you to take action to prep for any emergencies that could arise in your home or workplace. Make an emergency communication plan for both your home and workplace in the event of floods, wildfires, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, and winter storms. Educate yourself and your community with the dangers of these disasters and how to best cope with them.

This month is known for a lot of Hurricane activity and we want to make sure you are prepared in the event a storm does hit our area. 

Make sure you are prepared with a disaster supply kit. During an emergency, it is important that you have cell phone backup power, batteries, flashlights, bottled water, non-perishable food, a first aid kit, battery-powered radio, and portable generator Conduct practice drills with your family and co-workers for each scenario. Be sure that your home and belongings are properly insured. Talk to your neighbors and share your tips on preparedness. You never know when disaster will strike so it is important to take the proper precautions to ensure peace of mind. For more safety tips, along with a complete list of important emergency items visit ReadyVirginia.gov.

No Disaster Too Big

8/24/2016 (Permalink)

As some of you know, SERVPRO of Portsmouth has traveled all over the United States to help out when disaster strikes. We went up to New York when Hurricane Sandy hit and we stayed as long as we could to help out and get everything back to normal. This year, we were in West Virginia helping out with the massive flooding that they experienced in late June of this year. We spent over two weeks there helping the local residents deal with the devastation.  It is very important to us that we go where help is needed the most.

The recent flooding in New Orleans is obviously a great tragedy and our thoughts and prayers go out to all those affected. We have been on stand-by ever since the flooding started in case they need our help. With our extensive experience in dealing with these large scale disasters, there is no one better to be called in when catastrophe strikes. Whether it’s hundreds of miles away or right here in our own backyard, SERVPRO of Portsmouth is ready for action. There is no disaster too big! Call us today at 757-397-3770

Hurricanes in Hampton Roads

9/6/2013 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Hurricanes in Hampton Roads Hurricanes in our area!

Just about everyone living in the Hampton Roads area has had to deal with the effects of a hurricane at one point or another. In just the past 15 years, Hampton Roads has been hit by Hurricane Floyd in 1999, Hurricane Isabel in 2003, and Hurricane Irene in 2011. Anyone who was in the area for these storms knows the destruction that comes in the wake of these storms.  Even though there is nothing we can do to prevent storms of this magnitude, there are a lot of things that we can do to better prepare ourselves to deal with them. The first step is to be knowledgeable.

We have been very lucky in years past to have not had any major storms. By all accounts, we were in for a very busy hurricane season. While we are just now entering the peak of the season, we have not seen anything major hit land. Although we have been free and clear, it doesn’t mean we are out of the woods yet. Just last year Hurricane Sandy hit in October. Looking back at 2001, Hurricane Chantal kicked off the hurricane season in September and was followed up by 15 named storms, including nine hurricanes.

So what does this mean for Hampton Roads? It means we are not quite out of the woods yet but we are in the home stretch. Don’t let this period of inactivity lull you to sleep. It is more important than ever to have a plan and to be prepared. You can go to www.ready.gov for more information on making an emergency plan.

Call SERVPRO of Portsmouth today at 757-397-3770 and we can help you prepare for the storm. 

Roanoke Valley Floods

7/31/2013 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Roanoke Valley Floods Removing some of the wall after the water damage.

A couple years ago, Roanoke Valley got hit very hard with storms. The rain from the storms turned out to be too much for the rivers and lakes in the area and flooded them. As a result, most people in the area found themselves underwater.

This is where SERVPRO of Portsmouth comes in. We sent our storm team up to Roanoke for the week to help out. In the picture you can start to see the extent of the water damage. The water made its way almost halfway up the walls. Our techs were able to do a great deal towards getting Roanoke back to normal.

If the first storm wasn't bad enough, halfway through the restoration process, Roanoke got hit once again with a series of storms. Fortunately, it wasn't quite as bad and the SERVPRO of Portsmouth team was able to act fast to mitigate any damage. Call today at 757-397-3770.